Tag Archives: currency

Martin Armstrong On Proposal To Seize ‘Suspicious’ Cash, Precious Metals, Gems Entering EU

On Tuesday, I blogged about how individuals intending to carry legally-obtained and owned currency, precious metals, and gems into the European Union for their safe deposit boxes may want to take note of proposed rules seeking to enable European Union authorities to seize cash- “to include gold, precious stones and metals”- below the €10,000 threshold temporarily merely on suspicions of criminal activity.

Here’s one take on these rules from economist Martin Armstrong, who blogged yesterday:

The purpose of the rules is now openly being justified to fight against tax evasion, along with moonlighting and terror financing. The government clearly understands that cash is the only way for citizens to protect their savings from access by states and banks and any special levies or wealth taxes. Closing this door merely opens the door to cash investment turning to movable assets particularly shares.

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

An insightful post by Armstrong concerning this development across the pond, which you can read here on his company’s website.

By Christopher E. Hill
Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes (www.offshoresafedepositboxes.com)

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Latest On Proposal To Seize ‘Suspicious’ Cash, Precious Metals, Gems Entering EU

Individuals intending to carry legally-obtained and owned currency, precious metals, and gems into the European Union for their safe deposit boxes may want to take note of a December 5, 2017, press release on the European Parliament web site:

“Cross-border cash movements: tightening up anti-terror and crime checks”

• New rules beefing up rules on cash controls dating back to 2005
New definition of “cash”
• Disclosure declaration required for cash sent by freight

Tougher checks on cash entering or leaving the EU were backed by the Civil Liberties and Economic Affairs committees on Monday.

The new rules repeal the First Cash Control Regulation (CCR) from 2005, which requires individuals to declare sums over €10,000 when leaving or entering the EU. MEPs want to close loopholes exploited by criminals, such as divergent penalties in different member states, travelling with sums just below the declaration threshold or using means of transferring value that are not covered by current rules.

To prevent the proceeds of crime from re-entering the economy or money being used to finance illegal activities, MEPs agreed to:

widen the definition of “cash” to include gold, precious stones and metals, as well as anonymous prepaid electronic cash cards,

enable the authorities to impound cash below the €10,000 threshold temporarily, if criminal activity is suspected, and

• make it mandatory to disclose “unaccompanied” cash sent by cargo.

MEPs also asked the EU Commission to draft legislation to bring about a convergence of cash control penalties in the member states and study the possibility of establishing a Union Financial Intelligence Unit by 2019.

The draft law was adopted Monday evening by 55 votes to 3, with 4 abstentions…

Next steps

The text still needs to be approved by the Parliament as a whole, before MEPs can start negotiating the legislation with EU governments…

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

Once again, the proposed rules seek to enable EU authorities to seize cash- “to include gold, precious stones and metals”- below the €10,000 threshold temporarily merely on suspicions of criminal activity.

This initiative may sound familiar to regular readers of Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes as I first blogged about it back on December 28, 2016.

You can read the entire press release on the European Parliament site here.

By Christopher E. Hill
Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes (www.offshoresafedepositboxes.com)

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Nomad Capitalist’s ’10 Tips For Buying Gold In 2018′

Still on the topic of gold (often socked away in safe deposit boxes) today, back on November 13 Andrew Henderson penned an article on the Nomad Capitalist website entitled “10 Tips for Buying Gold in 2018.” I’ve mentioned Andrew and his company before on the blog, but for those readers not familiar with them, Henderson is the founder and managing partner of Hong Kong-headquartered Nomad Capitalist, billed as the “world’s leading offshore consulting firm.” Anyway, from the piece:

Not too long ago, my friend Claudio Grass – an expert in the gold business – shared the short version of his top ten tips for buying gold. Knowing the wealth of knowledge he possesses, I asked him to sit down for an interview so we could create the long version of that same list. His insights into the world of gold did not disappoint.

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

Some particular “insights” that jumped out at me:

• “As a general rule, if you have over $50,000 to invest in gold, store it in a safe jurisdiction. For anything less than that, keep it nearby.”
• According to Grass, two European nations qualify as safe jurisdictions. Joshua Rotbart, a “global expert on precious metals for investment” mentioned in the piece, added two more countries in Asia to the list.
• “Physical gold is the antidote to the current system. The current banking system is based on credit, paper, and computer digits. The crisis that we are expecting- the reason so many people are buying gold to protect themselves- will be a huge banking crisis. Therefore, if you decide to purchase physical gold, it’s only logical to store it outside of that banking system. Property rights in the banking system are of a temporary nature. Banks in the past have confiscated physical gold and cash, and there is always the possibility of a bail-in where all assets will undoubtedly be confiscated.”
• Echoing yesterday’s blog post about Jim Rickards and the information he received about gold being moved from banks to Swiss private vaults, Joshua Rotbart added:

Clients are moving their assets from bank vaults to privately held vaults. There are a few reasons for that:

Better access to their assets (they are no longer dependent on business hours, the goodwill of the banker etc.);
Increased distance from the reach of governments and regulators;
Better service; and
Better value for money.”

Henderson was right. Claudio’s insights into the world of gold did not disappoint. You can read the entire piece here on the Nomad Capitalist website.

Still more on the yellow metal later.

By Christopher E. Hill
Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes (www.offshoresafedepositboxes.com)

(Editor’s note: The mention of a particular individual/business should not be construed as confirmation of services claimed to be provided or any sort of recommendation. A qualified professional should be consulted prior to making a financial decision based on material found in this weblog. If this recommended course of action is not pursued, then it must be understood that the decision is the reader’s and the reader’s alone. Christopher E. Hill, the creator/Editor of this blog, is not responsible for any personal liability, loss, or risk incurred as a consequence of the use and application, either directly or indirectly, of any information presented on the site.)

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Economist Martin Armstrong Warns Of Storing Assets In U.S. Bank Safe Deposit Boxes

We’re back after a short break. And to jump start the continued discussion about asset protection outside the United States, I’d like to point out a February 25 blog post by economist Martin Armstrong on his company’s website. Regular readers of Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes know that Armstrong brings up bank safe deposit boxes from time to time, and the head of Armstrong Economics penned the following while I was away:

Keep in mind the government can close all banks for there is precedent. Whatever you have in a safe deposit box can also be seized and inspected.

There is no precise law against storing metal or cash in a safe deposit box. But law is malleable in the hands of any judge. He can seize the money or gold under the pretense of money laundering hiding it from the government. Under Civil Asset Forfeiture, they can assume the money is guilty of a crime being even tax evasion. It then is your burden to fight in court to get it back if you can hire a lawyer…

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

Keep in mind that Armstrong is referring to safe deposit boxes in U.S. financial institutions here, not secured storage containers located in private vaults outside the American banking system.

That being said, the economist sees a “global trend” in the seizure of assets through claims of money laundering and tax evasion. I blogged back on June 6, 2016:

Martin Armstrong… has chimed in on the new HSBC safe deposit box regulations in Hong Kong. He issued this warning on his company’s blog Friday:

Governments are targeting safe-deposit boxes to look for cash that is hiding from taxation. HSBC, a U.K. bank, is now moving against claimed financial crimes by altering conditions for safe-deposit boxes. This is becoming a global trend. Anything of value that is stored in a safe-deposit box is now considered money laundering. Governments want their taxes and all the laws are changing to ensure they get their money.

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

“Anything of value that is stored in a safe-deposit box is now considered money laundering”

Does that include legally-purchased and owned precious metals (with receipts to boot also showing taxes paid when applicable)?

Once again, these are bank safe deposit boxes Armstrong is talking about.

To date, I haven’t encountered anything by Mr. Armstrong about boxes in private, non-bank vaults.

By Christopher E. Hill
Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes (www.offshoresafedepositboxes.com)

(Editor’s note: A qualified professional should be consulted prior to making a financial decision based on information found in this weblog. If this recommended course of action is not pursued, then it must be understood that the decision is the reader’s and the reader’s alone. Christopher E. Hill, the creator/Editor of this blog, is not responsible for any personal liability, loss, or risk incurred as a consequence of the use and application, either directly or indirectly, of any information presented on the site.)

Source:

Armstrong, Martin. “Is it Safe to Store Gold in a Safe Deposit Box?” Armstrong Economics Blog. 25 Feb. 2017. (https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/markets-by-sector/precious-metals/gold/is-it-safe-to-store-gold-in-a-safe-deposit-box/). 7 Mar. 2017.

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Related Reading: Another Take On ‘Old’ Gold Coins Being Better Than Bullion Against Confiscation

Earlier this week I discussed two recent blog posts by economist Martin Armstrong concerning what he thinks is the most effective way to possess and retain physical gold in the face of government confiscation.

My understanding was “genuine old coins,” as:

Coins are better than bullion for they have some historical value. Their historical value could be an excuse to prevent confiscation if government simply declares that “gold is for criminals,” as they are trying to do with cash…

Another take on this comes from offshore expert Mark Nestmann, head of Phoenix, Arizona-based The Nestmann Group, who pointed out the following on The Silver Bear Cafe website some time ago:

Some coin dealers claim that numismatic (collector) coins would be exempt from any future government confiscation of gold and silver. This claim is based on the terms of Roosevelt’s 1933 emergency order, which specifically exempted “coins having recognized special value to collectors of rare and unusual coins.”

Some firms say that premiums of at least 15% over the spot price of bullion magically turn coins “numismatic.” This notion is based on a proposed federal regulation issued in 1984, but never adopted. Other dealers claim that coins 100 years or older are automatically converted to numismatic status.

It’s beyond me why anyone takes these claims seriously. Why would a government that stole its citizens’ property in 1933 be consistent when it does so again?

Nothing obliges the federal government to pay by the same set of “rules” it imposed 75 years go. Nothing obliges the federal government to honor the terms of a proposed regulation issued a quarter century ago. And naturally, those rules can change at any time

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

What Nestmann wrote has stuck with me as I keep coming across the debate over what makes a coin “numismatic.” I even stumbled on the following just the other night on the website of a company offering asset protection services:

For a coin to be numismatic, its retail price must be double the value of its metal content.

Perhaps all for naught, according to Nestmann?

An insightful piece (he does espouse positioning “some gold and silver bullion outside the United States, preferably in a safety deposit box or a private vault”), which you can read in its entirety here on The Silver Bear Cafe site. For more information about The Nestmann Group, visit their website here.

By Christopher E. Hill
Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes (www.offshoresafedepositboxes.com)

(Editor’s note: The mention of businesses above should not be construed as confirmation of services claimed to be provided or any sort of recommendation. A qualified professional should be consulted prior to making a financial decision based on material found in this weblog. If this recommended course of action is not pursued, then it must be understood that the decision is the reader’s and the reader’s alone. Christopher E. Hill, the creator/Editor of this blog, is not responsible for any personal liability, loss, or risk incurred as a consequence of the use and application, either directly or indirectly, of any information presented on the site.)

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Martin Armstrong: Old Gold Coins Better Than Bullion Against Confiscation

In two January blog posts on his company’s website, economist Martin Armstrong shared what he thinks is the most effective way to possess and retain physical gold in the face of government confiscation.

On January 10, Armstrong advised his blog readers:

As we move forward, it will be best to hold assets out of banks and out of currency. They can even declare gold a criminal act to possess, which is why I suggest genuine old coins rather than bullion. Just another layer of protection…

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

On January 16, the head of Armstrong Economics elaborated:

Coins are better than bullion for they have some historical value. Their historical value could be an excuse to prevent confiscation if government simply declares that “gold is for criminals,” as they are trying to do with cash. I believe Trump would not go along with that move…

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

I can’t fault Mr. Armstrong’s insistence on holding assets “out of banks and out of currency” considering recent events of wealth confiscation (as catalogued on this blog’s sister site- Offshore Private Vaults) being carried out by governments and banks around the world.

Neither can I argue with the economist’s recommendation of “old coins” versus bullion as it concerns potential gold confiscation. “Just another layer of protection” might be a good thing considering the uncertain times we live in today.

That being said, proponents of bullion contend numismatic coins mean “less bang for the buck” (less gold for your money) and there’s no guarantee this form of the yellow metal will be exempted from a future confiscation.

By Christopher E. Hill
Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes (www.offshoresafedepositboxes.com)

(Editor’s note: A qualified professional should be consulted prior to making a financial decision based on material found in this weblog. If this recommended course of action is not pursued, then it must be understood that the decision is the reader’s and the reader’s alone. Christopher E. Hill, the creator/Editor of this blog, is not responsible for any personal liability, loss, or risk incurred as a consequence of the use and application, either directly or indirectly, of any information presented on the site.)

Sources:

Armstrong, Martin. “Monetary Devaluations & Cancellations” Armstrong Economics Blog. 10 Jan. 2017. (https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/history/ancient-economies/monetary-devaluations-cancellations/). 17 Jan. 2017.

Armstrong, Martin. “Gold Bullion v Coins.” Armstrong Economics Blog. 16 Jan. 2017. (https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/markets-by-sector/precious-metals/gold/gold-bullion-v-coins/). 17 Jan. 2017.

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