Tag Archives: The Nestmann Group

Casey Research Articles About Gold Coins For Storing Wealth Offshore

Continuing on the subject of gold and storing it offshore, I’d like to bring up two articles I recently read on the Casey Research website. Casey Research was founded by Doug Casey, an American author, publisher, and investor, who also serves as chairman of the Delray Beach, Florida-based investment research firm. Regular readers know I’ve mentioned Casey before on this blog.

Back on May 18, 2017, an article entitled “Doug Casey’s Two Top Ways to Store Wealth Abroad” appeared on CaseyResearch.com. In it, International Man Senior Editor Nick Giambruno (who I’ve also mentioned in the past) asked Casey, “What forms of savings are good candidates to take abroad?” He replied:

Everybody should own gold coins because they are money in its most basic form-something that a lot of people have forgotten. Gold is the only financial asset that’s not simultaneously somebody else’s liability. And if your gold is outside the US, it gives you another degree of insulation should the United States decide that you shouldn’t own it.

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

“It gives you another degree of insulation should the United States decide that you shouldn’t own it.”

I would add “domestically” to the end of that statement.

More recently, a piece entitled “The Ultimate 4-Step ‘Freedom Insurance’ Plan” appeared on the Casey Research website. In the interview of Nick Giambruno by Chris Lowe, editor of Bonner & Partners’ Inner Circle, gold coins were mentioned again as “the easiest way to lessen the political risk to your savings.” From the October 3 exchange:

LOWE: What form of gold are we talking about- bullion, gold coins, ETFs?
GIAMBRUNO: Physical gold is your best option. Then you don’t have any counterparty risk. Having some gold in your possession in your home country is good. But having another stash in a foreign country is even better. You can either store it at a foreign property. Or you can store it in a non-bank safe deposit box.
LOWE: Why not a safe deposit box in a bank?
GIAMBRUNO: When President Roosevelt criminalized the possession of gold in 1933, federal agents went through bank safe deposit boxes searching for undeclared gold. Today, bank safe deposit boxes fall under the regulations and jurisdictions of banks. If there’s a bank holiday, like the one in Greece… or a bail-in like the one in Cyprus… or any event that shuts down or otherwise affects the banking industry, your bank safe deposit box is at risk. That’s not the case with non-bank vaulting and storage companies.

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

The subject of transporting gold coins out of the United States came up in the interview. From the exchange:

LOWE: What about gold coins? Can you just hop on a plane to Colombia or Argentina with gold coins in your pocket?
GIAMBRUNO: Well, it’s a gray area. And because it’s a gray area, I wouldn’t recommend taking more than a couple of gold coins with you when traveling abroad. The average TSA agent has probably never seen a gold coin in his life. He probably wouldn’t know what it was if he found one. But, if he thought it was something suspicious, he would confiscate it and let the courts sort it out. And that’s no fun. You’d have to go to court to get your metal back, and that would involve costly legal fees. I’ve taken gold coins across numerous borders, and I haven’t had a problem. But I’ve heard horror stories. And from personal experience, I can tell you that gold coins set off the X-ray machine. So there’s a decent chance the TSA folks- or their foreign counterparts- will find them. And remember, if you take more than $10,000 of “cash” in or out of the US, you need to file a “Report of International Transportation of Currency and Monetary Instruments” with FinCEN, a branch of the Treasury Department that deals with financial “crimes.”

Giambruno ultimately concluded:

You’re better off buying coins when you’re already in your destination country. Taking gold coins with you is just too risky.

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

Back on March 20, 2014, I blogged about transporting precious metals out of the United States to place in an overseas safe deposit box. In that post, I pointed out offshore expert Mark Nestmann discussed the process in-depth on the Financial Sense website in September 2012. His thoughts on the matter?

While it’s perfectly legal to move precious metals in or out of the United States, you must understand the reporting rules before you begin. Otherwise, your risk confiscation of your metals along with possible civil and criminal sanctions. You’re much better off paying an armored security service such as Brinks or ViaMat to transport the metals for you.

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

You can read the two articles on the Casey Research site here and here, respectively.

By Christopher E. Hill
Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes (www.offshoresafedepositboxes.com)

(Editor’s note: The mention of a particular individual/business should not be construed as confirmation of services claimed to be provided or any sort of recommendation. A qualified professional should be consulted prior to making a financial decision based on material found in this weblog. If this recommended course of action is not pursued, then it must be understood that the decision is the reader’s and the reader’s alone. Christopher E. Hill, the creator/Editor of this blog, is not responsible for any personal liability, loss, or risk incurred as a consequence of the use and application, either directly or indirectly, of any information presented on the site.)

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Mark Nestmann: Offshore Your Physical Gold

Yesterday I brought up the recent Nomad Capitalist article “10 Tips for Buying Gold in 2018” in which gold expert Claudio Grass said:

As a general rule, if you have over $50,000 to invest in gold, store it in a safe jurisdiction. For anything less than that, keep it nearby.

And according to Grass, “safe jurisdictions” meant two European countries.

Offshore expert Mark Nestmann also talked about storing physical gold locally and offshore in a July 9 piece on the International Living website. In “Why You Should Store Gold Overseas to Protect Your Money,” Nestmann informed readers:

You may already have gold safely stored at home or in a domestic vault. While that’s a smart plan, there is an even safer way to store your gold: Keep it overseas.

If all your wealth is in the U.S., it’s vulnerable. If you are sued in the U.S. (a one-in-three risk for U.S. citizens) and lose, a creditor can foreclose on your U.S. assets, including your domestic gold. Gold stored overseas, however, is much more difficult for creditors to seize.

Second, there’s political risk. In 1933, Franklin Delano Roosevelt forced all gold-owners to turn their holdings over to the government. I don’t think a recurrence is likely, as gold is no longer the standard to which we peg our money. But moving your gold overseas gives you peace of mind.

Of course, it’s possible that the country you move your gold to could enforce a U.S. general gold confiscation order. But that’s never happened before. And in countries like Austria, Switzerland, and Singapore, doing so would violate their own ultraprotective wealth preservation laws.

The head of The Nestmann Group went on to talk about the three options available to Americans for keeping their gold overseas, one of which is “direct storage” and “a safe deposit box at a private vault.”

A short but informative primer on offshore gold storage, which you can read here on the International Living site.

By Christopher E. Hill
Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes (www.offshoresafedepositboxes.com)

(Editor’s note: The mention of a particular individual/business should not be construed as confirmation of services claimed to be provided or any sort of recommendation. A qualified professional should be consulted prior to making a financial decision based on material found in this weblog. If this recommended course of action is not pursued, then it must be understood that the decision is the reader’s and the reader’s alone. Christopher E. Hill, the creator/Editor of this blog, is not responsible for any personal liability, loss, or risk incurred as a consequence of the use and application, either directly or indirectly, of any information presented on the site.)

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No More Than 4 Years Left To Implement Effective Asset Protection Plans?

Last week I brought up a recent article by Mark Nestmann entitled “‘Asset Protection’ Isn’t A Scam” in which the offshore expert made some solid arguments in defense of Americans’ legal use of asset protection, which includes offshoring.

Since that time, I’ve come across a related piece by Olivier Garret on Forbes.com. Who is Garret? From his Forbes Contributor bio:

I am founding Partner and CEO of Mauldin Economics and Garret/Galland Research, leading publishers of financial research geared to individual investors and institutions. In 2012, I launched the Hard Assets Alliance, a revolutionary trading platform for precious metal investors. In addition, I’m managing partner of three hedge funds invested in the resource sector. Between 2007 and 2015, I was CEO and Partner of Casey Research, a publisher of financial research focused on the resource sector. The company was successfully sold to Stansberry & Associates in May of 2015…

Back on August 2, Garret penned an article entitled “Every Investor Is One Misstep Away From Losing Everything — And It Has Nothing To Do With Crashes” which should give Americans with even modest wealth pause for thought. Garret warned of increasing threats to personal assets posed by the legal system and desperate politicians hunting money in an era of growing class warfare and attraction to socialism in the United States. He wrote:

Whether or not we like President Trump, his election may have handed us a short-term reprieve from the collectivist movement in the US. Long term, though, I believe the US is on an inevitable path toward more socialism.

To fill its empty coffers, state and federal governments must take assets from savers, entrepreneurs, and hard-working professionals.

Why?

Because the U.S. lacks the political will to reduce its debt burden and make meaningful cuts to programs or benefits.

Anyone who has accumulated a bit of wealth has a very short window—probably no more than four years—to implement well-structured asset protection and estate plans.

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

A thought-provoking piece by Olivier Garret, which you can read here on the Forbes website.

By Christopher E. Hill
Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes (www.offshoresafedepositboxes.com)

(Editor’s note: The mention of a particular business should not be construed as confirmation of services claimed to be provided or any sort of recommendation. A qualified professional should be consulted prior to making a financial decision based on material found in this weblog. If this recommended course of action is not pursued, then it must be understood that the decision is the reader’s and the reader’s alone. Christopher E. Hill, the creator/Editor of this blog, is not responsible for any personal liability, loss, or risk incurred as a consequence of the use and application, either directly or indirectly, of any information presented on the site.)

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‘Asset Protection’ Joins ‘Offshore’ In Coming Under Attack?

Yesterday I noted the negative connotation associated with the word “offshore” these days.

Apparently, the term “asset protection” is increasingly being demonized as well.

Mark Nestmann, an expert in both these matters, shared his observations about growing villification back on September 26, 2017, in an article on The Nestmann Group’s website. Nestmann wrote in “‘Asset Protection’ Isn’t a Scam”:

In the last few months, I’ve noticed an increasing stream of articles in the professional journals I read with the same theme: only tax evaders, fraudsters, and criminals pursue asset protection.

If I were a trial lawyer who earned his living by suing defendants with deep pockets, I might feel the same way. But you shouldn’t…

Nestmann put forth some solid arguments in defense of Americans’ legal use of asset protection, which includes offshoring.

An interesting and insightful read, which you can view here on The Nestmann Group’s site.

By Christopher E. Hill
Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes (www.offshoresafedepositboxes.com)

(Editor’s note: The mention of a particular business should not be construed as confirmation of services claimed to be provided or any sort of recommendation. A qualified professional should be consulted prior to making a financial decision based on material found in this weblog. If this recommended course of action is not pursued, then it must be understood that the decision is the reader’s and the reader’s alone. Christopher E. Hill, the creator/Editor of this blog, is not responsible for any personal liability, loss, or risk incurred as a consequence of the use and application, either directly or indirectly, of any information presented on the site.)

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Related Reading: Another Take On ‘Old’ Gold Coins Being Better Than Bullion Against Confiscation

Earlier this week I discussed two recent blog posts by economist Martin Armstrong concerning what he thinks is the most effective way to possess and retain physical gold in the face of government confiscation.

My understanding was “genuine old coins,” as:

Coins are better than bullion for they have some historical value. Their historical value could be an excuse to prevent confiscation if government simply declares that “gold is for criminals,” as they are trying to do with cash…

Another take on this comes from offshore expert Mark Nestmann, head of Phoenix, Arizona-based The Nestmann Group, who pointed out the following on The Silver Bear Cafe website some time ago:

Some coin dealers claim that numismatic (collector) coins would be exempt from any future government confiscation of gold and silver. This claim is based on the terms of Roosevelt’s 1933 emergency order, which specifically exempted “coins having recognized special value to collectors of rare and unusual coins.”

Some firms say that premiums of at least 15% over the spot price of bullion magically turn coins “numismatic.” This notion is based on a proposed federal regulation issued in 1984, but never adopted. Other dealers claim that coins 100 years or older are automatically converted to numismatic status.

It’s beyond me why anyone takes these claims seriously. Why would a government that stole its citizens’ property in 1933 be consistent when it does so again?

Nothing obliges the federal government to pay by the same set of “rules” it imposed 75 years go. Nothing obliges the federal government to honor the terms of a proposed regulation issued a quarter century ago. And naturally, those rules can change at any time

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

What Nestmann wrote has stuck with me as I keep coming across the debate over what makes a coin “numismatic.” I even stumbled on the following just the other night on the website of a company offering asset protection services:

For a coin to be numismatic, its retail price must be double the value of its metal content.

Perhaps all for naught, according to Nestmann?

An insightful piece (he does espouse positioning “some gold and silver bullion outside the United States, preferably in a safety deposit box or a private vault”), which you can read in its entirety here on The Silver Bear Cafe site. For more information about The Nestmann Group, visit their website here.

By Christopher E. Hill
Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes (www.offshoresafedepositboxes.com)

(Editor’s note: The mention of businesses above should not be construed as confirmation of services claimed to be provided or any sort of recommendation. A qualified professional should be consulted prior to making a financial decision based on material found in this weblog. If this recommended course of action is not pursued, then it must be understood that the decision is the reader’s and the reader’s alone. Christopher E. Hill, the creator/Editor of this blog, is not responsible for any personal liability, loss, or risk incurred as a consequence of the use and application, either directly or indirectly, of any information presented on the site.)

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Canada Introducing Bank ‘Bail-In’ Legislation

As concerns grow about the health of the global economy, ‘bail-in’ programs look to proliferate outside Europe. Leah Schnurr reported Tuesday afternoon on the Reuters website:

Canada will introduce legislation to implement a “bail-in” regime for systemically important banks that would shift some of the responsibility for propping up failing institutions to creditors.

The proposed plan outlined in the federal budget released on Tuesday would allow authorities to convert eligible long-term debt of a failing lender into common shares in order to recapitalize the bank, allowing it to remain operating.

The plan is in line with international efforts to address the potential risks to the financial system from institutions that are deemed too big to fail, the budget document said…

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

Funny how I just talked last night about “bail-ins” as part of a growing global trend of government/banking system wealth confiscation. Again, from the section entitled “Why Offshore Private Vaults” on this blog’s sister site

• Germany, July 2014, plans approved for creditor (may also mean depositor) bail-in of banks beginning in 2015, a year earlier than required under European-wide plans setting rules for failing financial institutions
• In November 2014, the G-20 Group of Nations endorsed a proposal which offshore experts The Nestmann Group says “profoundly changes the rules for banking globally, and not in a good way. Deposits in banks that are ‘too big to fail’ will be ‘promptly recapitalized’ with their ‘unsecured debt.’ This avoids those nasty taxpayer-funded bailouts that proved so politically unpopular during the 2008-2009 financial crisis. And the largest chunk of unsecured debt is your bank deposits. Insolvent banks will recapitalize themselves by converting your deposits- checking accounts, but also money market accounts and CDs- into stock. Thus, when you deposit money in a bank, you’re taking the same risk as someone buying a stock.”
• European Union, January 2016, new EU bank bail-in procedures implemented on New Year’s Day via the Bank Resolution and Recovery Directive. Central to the BRRD is the single resolution mechanism. The European Council (EU institution that defines the general political direction and priorities of the European Union ) said in a November 30, 2015, press release, “The single resolution mechanism (SRM) is aimed at ensuring the orderly resolution of failing banks without recourse to taxpayers’ money. This will involve both a systematic recourse to the bail-in of shareholders and creditors, in line with the EU’s directive on bank recovery and resolution, and the possible recourse to the SRF…” Note that bit about “creditors.” From my research on the subject, it has been argued that the terms “creditors” and “depositors” are interchangeable. As such, depositors may be on the hook for a future EU bank bail-in as a result of this new setup.

(Editor’s note: Bold added for emphasis)

Could depositors be targeted in a future Canadian bank bail-in as a result of this coming legislation? Is there a scenario where assets stored in bank safe deposit boxes might also be threatened? It’s too early to tell at this point.

Stay tuned…

By Christopher E. Hill
Offshore Safe Deposit Boxes (www.offshoresafedepositboxes.com)

(Editor’s note: A qualified professional should be consulted prior to making a financial decision based on information found in this weblog. If this recommended course of action is not pursued, then it must be understood that the decision is the reader’s and the reader’s alone. Christopher E. Hill, the creator/Editor of this blog, is not responsible for any personal liability, loss, or risk incurred as a consequence of the use and application, either directly or indirectly, of any information presented on the site.)

Source:

Schnurr, Leah. “Canada to introduce ‘bail-in’ bank recapitalization legislation.” Reuters. 22 Mar. 2016. (http://www.reuters.com/article/us-canada-budget-banks-idUSKCN0WO2Y5). 23 Mar. 2016.

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